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lay staff in a veterinary practice

By November 27, 2020 No Comments

17.1  Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses working for an organisation or practice have shared responsibilities relating to the provision of veterinary services by the team and business. A clearly-reasoned and recorded decision should therefore be behind every delegation to an unqualified member of staff. Employee layoffs allow you to cut costs while preserving your relationship with your most critical employees. Plan first for your organization's future … 17.7  Some veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses are responsible for leading or managing other members of the veterinary team or running the practice in full or in part. At all times, veterinary surgeons remain subject to their professional responsibilities and the RCVS Code of Professional Conduct. 17.5  Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses should be aware of and adhere to all of their responsibilities as set out in the relevant equalities legislation* and should take steps to challenge unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation where it arises. Membership of committees & sub-committees, Regulations, rules and the election scheme, The Veterinary Nursing Golden Jubilee Award, Exemption Orders & Associates Working Party, Veterinary Nursing Schedule 3 Working Party, Review of Under Care and Out of Hours Emergency Cover, Part 4: Introduce a modern ‘Fitness to Practise’ regime, Veterinary nurse pre-registration examinations, Maintaining and amending your registration, Try, try and try again: some personal reflections on the development of the anaesthetic propofol, The importance of public engagement in science, Challenges facing the UK veterinary profession over the next 10 years, Veterinary Nurse Patient-Based Assessment, Continuing Professional Development (CPD), Postgraduate and post-registration qualifications, Certificate in Advanced Veterinary Practice (CertAVP), Certificate in Advanced Veterinary Nursing, Edward Jenner Veterinary Leadership Programme, Which accreditation is right for your practice and how to apply, About Stanley, our support system for the PSS. Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses continue to have responsibility for animal health and welfare when they perform non-clinical duties and they remain accountable to the RCVS for their decisions and actions. If you continue we’ll assume you are happy to receive them. 19.1  The purpose of this guidance is to explain the restrictions that apply under the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 (‘the Act’) to ensure that animals are treated only by those people qualified to do so. d.  the availability of qualified assistance. Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses in leadership roles should make sure that staff are clear about the proper scope of their role and responsibilities. Veterinary surgeons should make every effort personally to discuss cases with farriers. Regardless of any training or experience these staff members may have, in the context of the veterinary practice, such staff should be regarded as unqualified or laypeople. If in the course of an RCVS investigation into a concern it appears that a veterinary surgeon or veterinary nurse has followed working systems, practices or protocols which contravene the RCVS Codes of Professional Conduct, the veterinary surgeon or veterinary nurse responsible for the working systems, practices or protocols will be at least as accountable as the veterinary surgeon or veterinary nurse who has followed them. This site makes use of cookies, which we use to collect anonymised statistical data to improve your experience, and not for marketing purposes. While veterinary surgeons are exempt from the restrictions in the Farriers Registration Acts 1975 and 1977, farriers are not exempt from the restrictions in the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966, and may not carry out procedures deemed to be acts of veterinary surgery. 19.15  Both veterinary surgeons and farriers are involved in the treatment of horses' feet. 17.10  Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses should ensure processes are in place to ensure that professional staff for whom they are responsible are registered, for example, by checking the Register online or by checking with the RCVS. 17.12  Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses should ensure that support staff for whom they are responsible are competent, courteous and properly trained. Veterinary surgeons should have particular regard to this issue when carrying out locum work, as although the practice’s insurance is likely to provide cover for negligence claims, it may not provide any other type of cover. 'Veterinary surgery' is defined within the Act as follows: ‘“veterinary surgery” means the art and science of veterinary surgery and medicine and, without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, shall be taken to include: a.  the diagnosis of diseases in, and injuries to, animals including tests performed on animals for diagnostic purposes; b.  the giving of advice based upon such diagnosis; c.  the medical or surgical treatment of animals; and, d.  the performance of surgical operations on animals.’. Support staff should be advised to pass on any request for urgent attention to a veterinary surgeon and be trained to recognise those occasions when it is necessary for a client to speak directly to a veterinary surgeon. Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses have a personal professional responsibility to comply with the RCVS Codes of Professional Conduct . However, the animal must still be registered with a veterinary surgeon. c. Have overall responsibility within the organisation for the procedures by which  medicines are obtained, stored, administered, sold or supplied, and disposed. 19.16  There is no clear demarcation line between veterinary surgeons and farriers in the exercise of their professional responsibilities, so that much depends on individuals and the relationship between them. Alternatively, the musculoskeletal therapist may ask the client for formal consent to disclose any concerns to the veterinary surgeon that has their animal under their care. Musculoskeletal therapists carry out a range of manipulative therapies, including physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic therapy. We do this by setting, upholding and advancing the. The delegating veterinary surgeon should therefore have regard to the following: a.  the nature of the task (i.e. If you continue we’ll assume you are happy to receive them. 19.12  The RCVS considers that there are certain tasks that should not be delegated to unqualified members of staff; examples include intramuscular or intravenous injections, and invasive procedures such as the introduction of an IV catheter or the passage of a urinary catheter. If he feels that either the veterinary surgeon is treating the animal incorrectly, or that a further condition is present requiring treatment, he should notify the veterinary surgeon or advise the owner to call in the veterinary surgeon. from a solicitor or accountant) to ensure equivalence with professional indemnity insurance. 17.20  The Home Office, which has responsibility for drugs controlled by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 has indicated that (1) where it is clear employee veterinary surgeons are responsible for the purchase and supply of these drugs in the company's name and these are to be used directly by a veterinary surgeon acting in their professional capacity treating individual patients, Home Office licences for the possession and supply of controlled drugs are not required and (2) it is desirable for the appointed senior veterinary surgeon to be responsible for company procedures by which these drugs are obtained, stored, administered, sold or supplied, and disposed of by employee (and locum) veterinary surgeons. Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses in such roles have additional responsibilities.

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